Two Things

I remember saying in this blog previously that I do not appreciate anonymity, and it seems I have more reasons of late to do so, because of all the very senseless remarks, and acid judgements dished out by some in the name of anonymity. It is very easy for people to just bask in anonymity, and call people names, although if the readers just knew the name of the writer they would probably not pay much attention to what is being said.
Having said that, I would also add that I get some very illuminating comments from some anons, and I appreciate those, which is why I have made it easier to comment in this blog. I have decided to remove pre moderation, so whatever you comment will stay without me approving of them first. But this does not change that this is a moderated blog, and if I find any comments to be defamatory of any person, I will remove them. Since this is my blog, I am responsible and answerable for whatever comments anyone puts here, as per the law.
All I can ask people to do is not make any vicious remarks, or use bad language. I will remove them.

The other thing is that I once made a comment in this blog which I later removed, but I think I will put it back again, and any bashing is welcome, given that they are directed to me, doesn’t have abusive language, and doesn’t offend anyone in terms of religion, ethnicity, nationality, or anything else that is personal and sensitive.
I wrote at one time how I was inspired by a statement: “You are a journalist first, and then a Bhutanese.”
I found this to be inspiring because I beleive that as a journalist, a person’s duty is to uncover the truth, whereas a nationalist would strive to project a positive a postive image of their country, denying what realities may exist.
By this I do not mean that in the name of journalism you should go about bad mouthing your country. I just mean that your most important duty should be to find out the truth.
And of course, we all have our own judgement after that, and the necessity to make public an information should be done with great thought. Every Journalist knows that what they publish should never harm the security of the people who live in their country, or anywhere else, for that matter.
But there are cases where people don’t want to let on that even in Bhutan we have crimes and so on, just because of all the “Shangri La” talk. Yes, we are an amazing country, but we have our own little problems too, and pretending that they don’t exist becasue we want to be proud of our country will not erase these problems.

Oh, and one more unrelated thing. I was attending the PM’s talk to principals in Paro on GNH, and he said a lot of thought provoking things, some of which I will write about later. One thing that struck me was what he said about the promotion and preservation of culture.
“Culture is very dynamic,” he said. “When we speak of preserving and promoting our culture, we are talking about ensuring that whatever is good is preserved and protected, and whatever is bad is changed.”
Hearing this made me feel very happy, and certainly elevated my opinion of this pillar of GNH, which I veiwed with some scepticism ever since I heard people making arguments such as “Night Hunting is a part of our culture and so it should not be banned”, and “We cant change those old phrases that call women ‘morems’ or talk about beating them, they are part of our culture.”
Our traiditional respect for elders, beautiful clothes and works of art, stories with lessons, lovely architecture, these are the things we must strive to keep. And statements and activities that bring down women, corporal punishment and violence those are things we should do away with. After all, our ancestors were not perfect, and if we were to keep doing what they do just because its ‘our culture’, we are losing the view on which GNH was founded.

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3 Comments

Filed under Bhutan, Comments, culture, GNH, Moderation

3 responses to “Two Things

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